Growing & Winemaking

 

New Methods to Limit Urea

February 2009
 
by Tim Patterson
 
Alternative text
The issues of urea and ethyl carbamate have been hovering over the wine industry like a little cloud for several years now. Urea, a minor byproduct of yeast metabolism, can combine with ethanol to form urethane--also known as ethyl carbamate or EC--a known carcinogen in animals and a likely carcinogenic danger for humans as well. The stubborn part of this problem--the reason it won't go away quietly--is that some urea is produced in every fermentation. Some of that urea always transforms itself into EC, and once it's there, it's devilishly hard to get rid of.
 

 
The full content of this article is available for subscribers to the print edition of Wines & Vines magazine. Subscribe now and get instant, online access to the full content of Wines & Vines magazine!
 
Currently subscribed users please log in at the top of this page.
 
SEE OTHER EDITIONS OF THIS COLUMN » CURRENT COLUMN ARTICLES ยป